ProjectWise Performance

Posted: March 4, 2013 in Performance
Tags: , , ,

This is the first of what will be many blogs about ProjectWise and Performance.  I’ll cover subjects that will help you understand what makes ProjectWise perform like a finely tuned sports car or a bus during rush hour.  The first topic to cover is latency and its effect on performance.

Much of the anticipated performance can be determined by the latency between clients and servers.  In today’s digital age, bandwidth and latency determine the speed at which you receive your data. The nice thing is that money will usually buy you more bandwidth, but when it comes to latency, that is not always the case. Latency is the measurement of the time it takes a packet of data to move back and forth. The data must go from the user interface into the kernel, out the network card, to switches, firewalls, routers, back to a network card, into the kernel, and then back through the same route. The time it takes this whole process to happen is referred to as latency. This operation may be repeated thousands of times per minute.  Therefore, a high latency returns poor performance regardless of bandwidth, which determines the amount of simultaneous packets that can be sent.

The chart below can help set expectation of performance. 

latency

In future blogs I’ll discuss ways that you can minimize the effects that latency will have on the user experience.

EJA

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Comments
  1. BenG says:

    What tools can we use to determine the network latency?

    • You can use a simple ping. Just open a command prompt and key-in ping, a space, and then the name of the server (or IP address of the server) the result should show you the latency in milliseconds (ms). You can also use a tool that is provided by Bentley called PWPing.exe. In addition to latency, this will also give you the ProjectWise Server route the data takes. There are some good instructions on the Bentley Communities site. http://communities.bentley.com

      EJA

    • Ping.exe or PWPing.exe will allow you to test latency.

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